Silver Arrows

For more than 75 years
the colour of success

Silvery elegance – pure power

The Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrows are a byword for für
remarkable technical feats and continuous success.

Drivers

Daredevil drivers
– smart winners

Vehicles

Silver Arrows from 1955

Silvery elegance – pure power

The Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrows are a byword for
remarkable technical feats and continuous success.

  • Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 25

    1934: Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 25

    The W 25 with supercharged engine was built for the 750-kg formula racing class. During the time it was used, from 1934 to 1936, the car was repeatedly modified and equipped with increasingly more powerful engines. Mercedes-Benz managed eleven Grand Prix victories with the W 25. Rudolf Caracciola was European champion in 1935.

    Displacement:8
    Maximum Output:3364 cc (205 cu in)
    Top speed:280 km/h (175 mph)
  • Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 125

    1937: Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 125

    The Mercedes-Benz W 125 was developed after a less successful 1936 season. In 12 Grand Prix races in 1937, it chalked up six first-place, nine second-place and six third-place finishes. Down to the beginning of the 1980s, it had the reputation for being the most powerful car to ever start in a Grand Prix race. Caracciola won his second European championship.

    Displacement:8
    Maximum Output:5663 cc (346 cu in)
    Top speed:320 km/h (200 mph)
  • Mercedes-Benz 3-litre formula racing car W 154

    1938: Mercedes-Benz 3-litre formula racing car W 154

    For the 1938 season, the weight of the racing cars was no longer limited, but the displacement was: to a maximum three litres with and 4.5 litres without supercharger. Mercedes-Benz had the right answer in the W 154, the make’s first twelve-cylinder car. It won six of the nine most important races in 1938 and helped Caracciola gain his third European champion’s title; in 1939, the W 154 won five out of seven races – the most successful driver was Hermann Lang.

    Displacement:V12
    Maximum Output:2962 cc (181 cu in)
    Top speed:285 km/h (177 mph)
  • Mercedes-Benz 1,5-litre formula racing car W 165 “Tripolis”

    1939: Mercedes-Benz 1,5-litre formula racing car W 165 “Tripolis”

    To exclude the successful Mercedes-Benz cars as competitors, the Italian organisers of the popular race in Tripoli announced that the 1939 race would be for 1.5-litre racing cars. In only eight months, Mercedes-Benz then developed an entirely new car that started in this one race only – and did so with success: on 7 May 1939, the W 165 posted a double victory against a superior force of 28 other racing cars.

    Displacement:V8
    Maximum Output:1493 cc (91 cu in)
    Top speed:272 km/h (169 mph)
  • Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R

    1954: Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R

    Return of the Silver Arrows to the Formula One: the first race in which the W 196 R competed, the French Grand Prix, ended in a double victory. “On that day we really only saw the competitors at the start and when we lapped them,” winner Juan Manuel Fangio is quoted. The W 196 R scored three more victories in 1954, and Fangio became world champion.

    Displacement:8
    Maximum Output:2497 cc (152 cu in)
    Top speed:275 km/h (170 mph)
  • Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R

    1955: Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R

    The W 196 R dominated the race tracks again in 1955. In the seven races of the season, it chalked up five victories, including four 1-2 finishes, and Juan Manuel Fangio repeated his win of the Formula One World Championship. The 300 SLR captured the sports car world championship and the 300 SL the European Touring Car Championship. At season’s end, Mercedes-Benz withdrew from motorsport to use the now free capacity for passenger car development.

    Displacement:8
    Maximum Output:2497 cc (152 cu in)
    Top speed:275 km/h (170 mph)
  • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -12

    1997: McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -12

    In the 1997 season, a silver-coloured car developed jointly with McLaren entered competition for the first time. In its first race, the McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -12 driven by David Coulthard won the Australian Grand Prix in Melbourne to get the season off to a good start. It was the first victory for Mercedes-Benz since returning to Grand Prix racing. Wins in Monza and Jerez followed.

    Displacement:V10
    Maximum Output:2998 cc (183 cu in)
    Top speed:343 km/h (213 mph)
  • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -13

    1998: McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -13

    The MP4 -13 was developed to comply with the new regulations for 1998. It demonstrated its dominance in its very first race: the two cars that started both finished a lap ahead of the third-place car. The MP4 -13 helped Mika Häkkinen win the Formula One World Championship driver’s title, while the team won the Formula One World Champion Constructor’s title.

    Displacement:V10
    Maximum Output:2998 cc (183 cu in)
    Top speed:352 km/h (219 mph)
  • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -14

    1999: McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -14

    The McLaren-Mercedes for the 1999 racing season was hard to tell apart from its predecessor, yet the MP4 -14 was a completely new car on account of the changed rules for this season. In Suzuka, in the Grand Prix of Japan, the last race of the season, Mika Häkkinen defended his World Champion’s title with it.

    Displacement:V10
    Maximum Output:2998 cc (183 cu in)
    Top speed:354 km/h (220 mph)
  • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 - 23

    2008: McLaren-Mercedes MP4 - 23

    The MP4 -23 also won its maiden race, the Australian Grand Prix in March 2008. Vodafone McLaren Mercedes won five more races in this season and finished second in the constructors’ competition. Lewis Hamilton wrote racing history in this car, capturing the World Championship driver’s title on the last bend of the last race after finishing the previous season as runner-up.

    Displacement:V8
    Maximum Output:2400 cc (147 cu in)
    Top speed:350 km/h (218 mph)
  • Brawn GP BGP 001

    2009: Brawn GP BGP 001

    Jenson Button and Rubens Barrichello were the drivers for Mercedes-Benz partner team. Brawn GP. Button won six out of the first seven races in the BGP 001 and took the World Championship title at the end of the season. Barrichello won two further races in the BGP 001. The same year saw McLaren-Mercedes driver Lewis Hamilton achieve a historic first victory for a Formula One racing car with KERS hybrid.

    Displacement:V8
    Maximum Output:2400 cc (147 cu in)
    Top speed:no date
  • Mercedes GP Petronas MGP W01

    2010: Mercedes GP Petronas MGP W01

    The 2010 season saw Michael Schumacher and Nico Rosberg start for the new Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrows works team in the MGP W01, which was the first thoroughbred works Mercedes-Benz Silver Arrow to be seen in Formula One since 1955. Nico Rosberg took three podium places with the MGP W01, the first of which was at the home race for title partner PETRONAS in Malaysia; by the end of the season, MERCEDES GP PETRONAS was in fourth place in the Constructors’ Championship..

    Displacement:V8
    Maximum Output:2400 cc (147 cu in)
    Top speed:no data
  • Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 – F1 W03

    2012: Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 – F1 W03

    At the 2012 Chinese Grand Prix at the Shanghai International Circuit, Nico Rosberg won his first-ever Grand Prix in his 111th Formula One Race – precisely 20,671 days after the last win by a works Silver Arrow, driven by Juan Manual Fangio in September 1955 in Monza. This success was also incidentally achieved exactly 111 years after the first-ever Mercedes victory at the “Nice Race Week” in 1901..

    Displacement:V8
    Maximum Output:2400 cc (147 cu in)
    Top speed:no data
  • Manfred v. Brauchitsch (1905 - 2003)

    Began his sporting career in 1928 as a motorcycle racer. Between 1934 and 1939, he was a member of the Mercedes-Benz team and won several major races, first and foremost the legendary 1934 Eifel race. Manfred von Brauchitsch was nicknamed Pechvogel, unlucky devil, because unfortunate circumstances repeatedly deprived him of victories and good placings. After his active racing days, he became the first president of the German Automobile Association (AvD) in 1948. In 1953, he moved to the former German Democratic Republic.

  • Rudolf Caracciola (1901 - 1959)

    Competed in his first race as factory driver in a Mercedes in Baden-Baden in 1923 and scored twelve victories before the year was over. In his career, the “rain champion” won well over 100 races and was the most successful German racing driver of the pre-war period. He was three times European champion (1935, 1937, 1938) and set numerous world speed records. He posted the highest speed in 1938 on the Frankfurt-Darmstadt autobahn: 432.7 km/h (268.9 mph) – a record for public roads which has held to this day.

  • Hermann Lang (1909 - 1987)

    After completing an apprenticeship as a mechanic, Lang began his career as a motorbike racer in 1927. In 1933, he joined the Mercedes-Benz testing department as a mechanic. Because of his impressive cornering skills, his talent for driving was discovered, and the company allowed him to compete for the first time in 1935. Along with many other races, he won the Grand Prix of Tripoli three times and superseded Caracciola as most successful driver in 1939. In 1952, Lang won the Le Mans 24 Hours together with Fritz Riess. In 1954, he retired from racing.

  • Juan Manuel Fangio (1911 - 1995)

    Fangio was a Formula One driver for Mercedes-Benz from 1954. With ten wins in all in two seasons, he convincingly won the 1954 and 1955 world championships in his Mercedes-Benz W 196 R. He subsequently raced for other teams for three more years and closed out his career in 1958 as five-time world champion. Not only that makes “knock-kneed” one of the most successful Formula One drivers in history: in 51 Grand Prix starts, he won 24 times. This success rate remains unsurpassed to this day.

  • Karl Kling (1910 - 2003)

    In the 1930s, Kling made a name for himself in touring car races and reliability trials. In 1952, he claimed victory in the Carrera Panamericana in a 300 SL despite his famous run-in with a vulture and was the first racing driver to be named German athlete of the year. In the 1954 season, Kling was a member of the newly formed Mercedes-Benz Formula One team and right off the bat finished second in Reims in the first race. As successor to racing manager Alfred Neubauer, he maintained contact with the racing scene after 1956.

  • Hans Herrmann (geb. 1928)

    Together with Juan Manuel Fangio and Karl Kling, Hans Herrmann was one of those racing drivers with whom the return of Daimler-Benz AG to Grand Prix motorsport was realised in the 1950s. Hans Herrmann finished third in the Swiss Grand Prix and fourth in the Italian Grand Prix. From 1956 on, he drove for various other teams. After seeing action in Formula Two and Formula One races, he capped his career with a victory in the Le Mans 24 Hours in 1970.

  • Sir Stirling Moss (geb. 1929)

    Stirling Moss and Juan Manuel Fangio dominated the 1955 Formula One season in which Moss won his home Grand Prix in the United Kingdom. In the sports car world championship of 1955, he won the Mille Miglia, the Tourist Trophy and the Targa Florio. After Daimler-Benz withdrew from motor racing, Stirling Moss competed very successfully for other manufacturers. Though always among the best, he never would be Formula One world champion. In 1962, he retired from active racing following a severe accident.

  • Mika Häkkinen (geb. 1968)

    The congenial Finn joined the McLaren-Mercedes team in 1995. Subsequent to a serious accident in Adelaide in 1995, he bounced back in 1996 with a respectable fifth-place finish in the season, opener. In the last race of the 1997 season he chalked up his first win in the Formula One. In 1998 and 1999, Mika Häkkinen was Formula One World Champion with McLaren-Mercedes. All told, he won 20 Grand Prix races. The Finn wound up his Formula One career at the end of the 2001 season.

  • David Coulthard (geb. 1971)

    In 1996, Scotsman David Coulthard went to McLaren-Mercedes where he was on a contract until 2004 and competed in a total of 150 Grand Prix races. With 56 points and third place in the driver’s title scoring, he contributed to the win of the Constructors’ World Championship by McLaren-Mercedes in 1998. Being runnerup in the World Championship of 2001 marked the climax of David Coulthard’s career. In more than a decade of Formula One racing, the Scotsman gathered 13 Grand Prix victories and finished third in the Championship four times.

  • Kimi Räikkönen (geb. 1979)

    In his first race for McLaren-Mercedes, in Australia in 2002, Kimi Räikkönen finished third to mount the winner’s rostrum for the first time in the Formula One. He scored his first Formula One victory in the second race of the 2003 season in Malaysia. Räikkönen was runner-up in 2003 and 2005 and won nine Grand Prix races for McLaren-Mercedes. He left the team at the end of 2006.

  • Lewis Hamilton (geb. 1985)

    From earliest youth, Lewis Hamilton has been fostered by Mercedes-Benz and McLaren. Since 2007, he has been under contract to Vodafone McLaren Mercedes. He finished third in his first Formula One race, the 2007 Australian Grand Prix. Runnerup in the driver’s title competition in the 2007 season, with four victories to his credit, in 2008, he became the youngest world champion in Formula One history and for this achievement received the very distinguished award, Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (MBE), from the hands of Queen Elizabeth II.

  • Jenson Button (geb. 1980)

    The Australian Grand Prix of 2009 was won by Jenson Button in the first race for the new Mercedes-Benz partner team Brawn GP, now the MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS Formula One team. Button won six of the first seven races of the season and the World Championship title at the end of the season. The British driver switched to McLaren Mercedes in 2010, proceeding to win his first Grand Prix for the team in the second race of the season, once again the Australian Grand Prix. In 2011, he took second place in the Drivers’ Championship behind World Champion Sebastian Vettel.

  • Nico Rosberg (geb. 1985)

    In terms of motor racing, Nico Rosberg is following in the footsteps of his father Keke, who won the Formula One World Championship title in 1982. In his very first Grand Prix, in 2006 in Bahrain, Rosberg drove the fastest lap time. However, he then had to wait until his 111th Formula One race for his first Grand Prix win, at the Chinese Grand Prix of 2012. Rosberg led the race in Shanghai in his MERCEDES AMG PETRONAS from pole position to take the chequered flag, so becoming the first works-team Silver Arrow winner of the new era.

  • Michael Schumacher (geb. 1969)

    Seven-time Formula One Champion Michael Schumacher returned to elite motor racing for the MERCEDES GP PETRONAS Formula One team in 2010 after a three-year absence from the sport. Schumacher remains the most successful Formula One driver of all time, holding the record for the most championship titles, the most wins, the most pole positions and the most fastest lap times. The record-breaking champion was fostered from an early stage of his career by Mercedes-Benz and also drove for the Mercedes-Benz Junior Team in the World Sportscar Championship.

Drivers:

    • Manfred v. Brauchitsch (1905 - 2003)
    • Rudolf Caracciola (1901 - 1959)
    • Hermann Lang (1909 - 1987)
    • Manfred v. Brauchitsch (1905 - 2003)
    • Rudolf Caracciola (1901 - 1959)
    • Hermann Lang (1909 - 1987)
    • Manfred v. Brauchitsch (1905 - 2003)
    • Rudolf Caracciola (1901 - 1959)
    • Hermann Lang (1909 - 1987)
    • Manfred v. Brauchitsch (1905 - 2003)
    • Rudolf Caracciola (1901 - 1959)
    • Hermann Lang (1909 - 1987)
    • Juan Manuel Fangio (1911 - 1995)
    • Karl Kling (1910 - 2003)
    • Hans Herrmann (geb. 1928)
    • Juan Manuel Fangio (1911 - 1995)
    • Hans Herrmann (geb. 1928)
    • Sir Stirling Moss (geb. 1929)
    • Mika Häkkinen (geb. 1968)
    • David Coulthard (geb. 1971)
    • Mika Häkkinen (geb. 1968)
    • David Coulthard (geb. 1971)
    • Mika Häkkinen (geb. 1968)
    • David Coulthard (geb. 1971)
    • Kimi Räikkönen (geb. 1979)
    • Lewis Hamilton (geb. 1985)
    • Jenson Button (geb. 1980)
    • Nico Rosberg (geb. 1985)
    • Michael Schumacher (geb. 1969)
    • Nico Rosberg (geb. 1985)
    • Michael Schumacher (geb. 1969)

Vehicles:

    • Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 25
    • Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 125
    • Mercedes-Benz 3-litre formula racing car W 154
    • Mercedes-Benz 1,5-litre formula racing car W 165 “Tripolis”
    • Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 25
    • Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 125
    • Mercedes-Benz 3-litre formula racing car W 154
    • Mercedes-Benz 1,5-litre formula racing car W 165 “Tripolis”
    • Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 25
    • Mercedes-Benz 750-kg formula racing car W 125
    • Mercedes-Benz 3-litre formula racing car W 154
    • Mercedes-Benz 1,5-litre formula racing car W 165 “Tripolis”
    • Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R
    • Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R
    • Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R
    • Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R
    • Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R
    • Mercedes-Benz Formula One racing car W 196 R
    • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -12
    • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -13
    • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -14
    • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -12
    • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -13
    • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 -14
    • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 - 23
    • McLaren-Mercedes MP4 - 23
    • Brawn GP BGP 001
    • Mercedes GP Petronas MGP W01
    • Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 – F1 W03
    • Mercedes GP Petronas MGP W01
    • Mercedes AMG Petronas F1 – F1 W03